First Chair Syrup

Each winter, our team of sugarmakers tap maple trees by drilling a small hole and inserting a spout.

In the springtime, freezing nights and warm days makes the maple sap flow from the trees.

The maple sap comes out of the tap as a slow drip, flowing into a network of tubing which runs throughout the sugar bush.

This network starts as small lines from the tap, draining into a central line that flows into tanks in the sugarhouse.

Our team uses a vacuum system to keep the sap flowing from tree tap to sugarhouse.

Once the sap flows down to the sugar house, it goes straight into the evaporator where it’s boiled into syrup.

Once the sap flows down to the sugar house, it goes straight into the evaporator where it’s boiled into syrup.

To produce the maple syrup, we boil the maple sap to evaporate the water, concentrating and caramelizing the sugars.

Did you know it takes about 40 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of maple syrup!

We use a wood-fired evaporator, carrying on a Vermont tradition that gives our syrup a distinct flavor.

The last step is to send the hot maple syrup through a filter press and into the bottle.

The last step is to send the hot maple syrup through a filter press and into the bottle.

Once the maple syrup is filtered, it goes straight into our line of bottles.

We taste the syrup each run to guarantee the finest quality. The color of our maple syrup is lightest in the beginning of the year and continues to darken throughout the season.

The syrup is then packaged and shipped from our sugar house to your home!